Protect-Adopt-Help-Serve

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Bark in the Park 2017

Bark in the Park 2017

By on Jan 29, 2017 in Featured, Front Page, Fund Raising | 0 comments

PAHS is ready for another awesome Bark in the Park event! Please put this important event on your calendar to support your local humane shelter. This year Bark in the Park will be Saturday, April 29th, from 10:00 am until 3:00 pm at Cooters Pond Park. Rain out date is Sunday, April 30th, from 12:00 pm until 3:00 pm. We need vendors, raffle items, baked goods, and of course lots and lots of people and dogs! Please put this important date on your calendar and plan to be at your humane shelter’s largest fund raiser of the spring. Micro-chipping will be available. We will also have baked goods, raffle items, the new 2017 t-shirts, children’s games, grilled concessions, pet contests, vendors, and much, much more; and of course the PAHS adoptable dogs and puppies will be there hoping to find homes. We are excited and we would like for this to be the best Bark in the Park ever! If you would like to donate raffle items or baked goods or you are interested in being a vendor please private message the Prattville/Autauga Humane Society’s FB page. Please support your local humane shelter by supporting this...

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Kitty Litter Needed!!! Any Type or Brand!!!

Kitty Litter Needed!!! Any Type or Brand!!!

By on Aug 27, 2016 in Featured, Front Page | 0 comments

PAHS is in desperate need of kitty litter. It is one item that we use daily and we will take any brand–clumping or non-clumping. Please drop your donations of kitty litter off at the shelter. As always we greatly appreciate your support. Please share this post so we can get the word out to get as many donations of kitty litter as possible....

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Buster’s Fund

Buster’s Fund

By on Aug 18, 2016 in Featured, Front Page | 0 comments

Buster’s Fund is a special fund designated for cats and dogs with special medical needs. This fund was started several years ago to save “Buster”, the sweet dog in the photo. A generous donor began the fund to treat his heartworms so that he could be adopted. Primarily, we use this donation fund to treat heartworm-positive dogs who are suitable and available for adoption. The dogs spend time in foster homes during their treatment process. When the pup is heartworm-free and is well, he or she is ready to go to its new family! Buster’s Fund is also used for medical needs per the Shelter Director’s discretion (i.e. tooth extraction, minor surgery, etc.). If you would like to donate, please do so via this website, mail, or phone. Thank you!...

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No Room for Rover

No Room for Rover

By on Mar 16, 2014 in Featured, Front Page, Fund Raising | 0 comments

Dear Residents of Prattville and Autauga County, Autauga County’s pet overpopulation numbers are alarming.  January- November of 2013, the Prattville Autauga Humane Society (PAHS) took in over 2,500 animals; this number includes strays, owner surrenders, and animals gathered by Animal Control officers. It is a shocking statistic of which most local animal lovers are not aware. While some of our cats and dogs are adopted, find permanent foster homes, or are sent to rescue organizations, others do not have such a bright future. As a result of Prattville and Autauga County’s increase in population, we have outgrown the shelter’s capacity. We can safely house 85 animals at one time. Since 2011 we have been raising money for our “No Room for Rover” kennel expansion project, which is estimated to cost approximately $150,000. To date, we have raised roughly $103,000. The new construction will include the following additions: 18 indoor/outdoor dog runs, a small dog/puppy room, a cat room, a feeding/bathing/work space, a medical examination area, and a storage room. State law requires that new in-takes must be held for seven days unless reclaimed. We need the additional kennels to keep new in-takes segregated from adoptable animals awaiting adoption. PAHS wants to begin building immediately; however, we cannot until we are closer to our monetary goal. We are asking for your financial support. Please consider making as generous a gift as you are able. It will be deeply appreciated and is also tax-deductible. Checks should be made payable to PAHS and mailed to P.O. Box 680697, Prattville, AL 36068. You may donate electronically via our website, www.prattvilleautaugahumane.org. Thank you for considering this request. If you have any questions about “No Room for Rover,” please call the shelter at 334-358-2882 and ask for Shelter Manager Claudia Rigsby. Together we can make an impact in our community: Protect-Adopt-Help-Serve! Sincerely, The Prattville Autauga Humane Society Board of...

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Bringing Your New Cat Home

Bringing Your New Cat Home

By on Mar 13, 2014 in Education, Featured, Front Page | 0 comments

Top 10 Things to Know When You Bring Your New Cat Home                         (Courtesy of the ASPCA©) Congratulations, the cat’s out of the bag! You’ve just entered into a wonderful relationship that’s bound to be filled with fun and affection. By starting off on the right foot—that is, by being well-prepared for your new arrival—you can move through that rocky adjustment period most new relationships go through and get right down to the lovin’!   1. Make Sure Everyone In The House Is Prepared To Have A Cat Talk to your family members before bringing a new cat home. Make sure everyone knows that the fun begins only after kitty feels safe and her needs are met. Once you’re sure everyone is ready for feeding, litter changing and grooming, you can divvy up chores among family members so everyone is prepared to care for kitty before she arrives.   2. Do You Know What Your Cat Is Trying To Tell You? The average cat has a vocabulary of more than 16 different sounds, including purring, howling, hissing and meowing—not to mention a wide-range of playful and serious body language. Taking a glance at the ASPCA’S Cat Care section online will help you understand your cat’s behavior before you’re faced with her mysterious cat calls, pouncing and nocturnal romps.   3. Stock Up On Supplies Before Kitty Arrives Have all of your cat’s needs ready so she can get right down to the business of making herself at home. Kitty will need: * A litter box and the brand of litter she’s been using * Food and water bowls and the food she’s used to eating * A sturdy, rough-textured scratching post—at least three feet high—that allows her to stretch completely while scratching. * Safe, stimulating toys. Hint: If you give her toys that make noises, you’ll know when she’s playing. * A bed lined with a soft, warm blanket or towel * Grooming tools: a high-quality brush and nail clipper are a good start   4. Identity Is Key Proper identification is a necessity. If your kitty is indoors-only, an ID tag or implanted microchip will help ensure...

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General Dog Care

General Dog Care

By on Jan 6, 2014 in Education, Featured | 0 comments

Experts say that dogs were domesticated between 12,000 and 25,000 years ago—and that all dogs evolved from the wolf. Since then, humans have selectively bred more than 400 breeds, ranging in size from four-pound teacup poodles to Irish wolfhounds, whose three-foot stature earns them the title of tallest canine. But the most popular pooches are non-pedigree—the one-of-a-kind dogs known as mixed-breeds. Cost The annual cost of a small dog—including food, veterinary care, toys and license—is $420. Make that $620 for a medium dog and $780 for a large pooch. This figure doesn’t include capital expenses for spay/neuter surgery, collar and leash, carrier and crate. Note: Make sure you have all your supplies (see our checklist) before you bring your dog home. Basic Care Feeding – Puppies 8 to 12 weeks old need four meals a day. – Feed puppies three to six months old three meals a day. – Feed puppies six months to one year two meals a day. – When your dog reaches his first birthday, one meal a day is usually enough. – For some dogs, including larger canines or those prone to bloat, it’s better to feed two smaller meals. Premium-quality dry food provides a well-balanced diet for adult dogs and may be mixed with water, broth or canned food. Your dog may enjoy cottage cheese, cooked egg, fruits and vegetables, but these additions should not total more than ten percent of his daily food intake. Puppies should be fed a high-quality, brand-name puppy food. Please limit “people food,” however, because it can result in vitamin and mineral imbalances, bone and teeth problems and may cause very picky eating habits and obesity. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times, and be sure to wash food and water dishes frequently. Exercise Dogs need exercise to burn calories, stimulate their minds, and keep healthy. Exercise also tends to help dogs avoid boredom, which can lead to destructive behaviors. Supervised fun and games will satisfy many of your pet’s instinctual urges to dig, herd, chew, retrieve and chase. Individual exercise needs vary based on breed or breed mix, sex, age and level of health—but a couple of walks around the block every day and ten minutes...

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