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Bark in the Park 2017

Bark in the Park 2017

By on Jan 29, 2017 in Featured, Front Page, Fund Raising | 0 comments

PAHS is ready for another awesome Bark in the Park event! Please put this important event on your calendar to support your local humane shelter. This year Bark in the Park will be Saturday, April 29th, from 10:00 am until 3:00 pm at Cooters Pond Park. Rain out date is Sunday, April 30th, from 12:00 pm until 3:00 pm. We need vendors, raffle items, baked goods, and of course lots and lots of people and dogs! Please put this important date on your calendar and plan to be at your humane shelter’s largest fund raiser of the spring. Micro-chipping will be available. We will also have baked goods, raffle items, the new 2017 t-shirts, children’s games, grilled concessions, pet contests, vendors, and much, much more; and of course the PAHS adoptable dogs and puppies will be there hoping to find homes. We are excited and we would like for this to be the best Bark in the Park ever! If you would like to donate raffle items or baked goods or you are interested in being a vendor please private message the Prattville/Autauga Humane Society’s FB page. Please support your local humane shelter by supporting this...

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Kitty Litter Needed!!! Any Type or Brand!!!

Kitty Litter Needed!!! Any Type or Brand!!!

By on Aug 27, 2016 in Featured, Front Page | 0 comments

PAHS is in desperate need of kitty litter. It is one item that we use daily and we will take any brand–clumping or non-clumping. Please drop your donations of kitty litter off at the shelter. As always we greatly appreciate your support. Please share this post so we can get the word out to get as many donations of kitty litter as possible....

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Buster’s Fund

Buster’s Fund

By on Aug 18, 2016 in Featured, Front Page | 0 comments

Buster’s Fund is a special fund designated for cats and dogs with special medical needs. This fund was started several years ago to save “Buster”, the sweet dog in the photo. A generous donor began the fund to treat his heartworms so that he could be adopted. Primarily, we use this donation fund to treat heartworm-positive dogs who are suitable and available for adoption. The dogs spend time in foster homes during their treatment process. When the pup is heartworm-free and is well, he or she is ready to go to its new family! Buster’s Fund is also used for medical needs per the Shelter Director’s discretion (i.e. tooth extraction, minor surgery, etc.). If you would like to donate, please do so via this website, mail, or phone. Thank you!...

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Declawing-The Painful Truth

Declawing-The Painful Truth

By on Jan 10, 2016 in Education, Front Page | 0 comments

Raise Your Paw and Do Not Declaw! By: Jenny Whisenhunt One of the many questions asked of our staff all too frequently is, “Is the cat declawed?” While the answer varies depending on the cat, felines who are relinquished to the shelter from home environments are often declawed; sometimes, an adopter will only consider adoption if a cat is declawed. But as any cat owner knows, a cat with his or her claws in-tact make loyal and loving companions, as well. This month, we at PAHS would like to bring attention to the painful reality of declawing our feline friends; in addition, we want to offer alternatives to this widely-debated issue among cat owners, veterinarians, and non-profit organizations. To begin with, the term “declawing” is misleading. According to information provided by The Paw Project, a California-based non-profit whose mission is to educate the public about the painful truths of declawing, an onychectomy, or declawing, is a series of bone amputations. Declawing is more accurately described by the term “de-knuckling” and is not merely the removal of the claws, as the term “declawing” implies. In humans, fingernails grow from the skin, but in animals that hunt prey, the claws grow from the bone; therefore, the last bone is amputated so the claw cannot re-grow. The last bone of each of the ten front toes of a cat’s paw is amputated. Also, the tendons, nerves, and ligaments that enable normal function and movement of the paw are severed. If this procedure were applied to humans, it would involve cutting off each finger at the last joint. With felines, complications are not uncommon as bleeding, infection, arthritis, chronic pain, lameness, nerve and tissue damage can result from this procedure. While the physical effects of declawing are painful, more disturbing is the emotional and behavioral trauma that occurs frequently with declawed cats. As noted, the cat’s first line of defense—its claws—is gone; if ever let outdoors, the cat has no way to protect itself. The Paw Project cites veterinary studies that reveal how the pain of declawing sometimes causes cats to be reluctant to walk or play, and as a result, owners sometimes neglect them or mistreat them. In fact, what many supporters...

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The Rewards of Fostering

By on Jan 10, 2016 in Front Page, Volunteers | 0 comments

Volunteers are Love in Motion By: Jenny Whisenhunt “Service to a just cause rewards the worker with more real happiness and satisfaction than any other venture of life.” -Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947), American Women’s Rights Activist The above quote by early 20th century humanitarian Carrie Chapman Catt speaks to the innumerable opportunities individuals have to serve those in need. Charities and non-profits span the globe; typically, when we hear the word “non-profit” larger, more recognizable names such as The Red Cross, Habitat for Humanity, Meals on Wheels, and the United Way come to mind. It is a common oversight to think of volunteering as just something nice that people can do in their spare time. Volunteering makes folks feel great about helping others, and it has an indisputable, concrete impact. The Corporation for National and Community Service cites that 61.8 million individuals in the United States contributed 8 billion hours of volunteerism in 2008 alone. Non-profit organizations are important, life-changing causes that have contributed volumes to the betterment of humankind; however, humans are not the only ones who need help. Volunteers walk dogs, pet cats, clean cages, help with adoptions and feedings, and contribute veterinary expertise to organizations like animal shelters and wildlife rehabilitation centers. The chance to give your time and love to animals exists locally at the Prattville Autauga Humane Society. Seniors, adults, teenagers, and children can help our shelter animals in many different capacities. If you are interested in volunteering on-site, or at the shelter itself, there is a variety of ways one can lend a hand. One of the most common activities in which volunteers participate is socializing and playing with our animals; this is a significant and meaningful service to the shelter animals. By making them accustomed to and unafraid of a variety of people, the cats and dogs have a better chance of being adopted; in addition, play and physical interaction offer them exercise, affection, and breaks up the monotony of their day. Coming out to socialize the shelter animals is also an ideal pursuit for individuals who are not able to have pets in their home, but love animals and want to spend quality time with them. Another way people can offer...

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